Startups disrupting death and mortgages

Posted on Aug 8, 2018

I’ve noticed an increase in startups that tackle topics such as death and mortgages. Not the traditionally sexy products or services that we’ve seen in the last 10 years, but something we all face, so it is rife for disruption.

Death is a topic too often ignored. People, especially young people, are the least likely to plan that far ahead. The majority of wills created by young people come about because their mortgage company requested they create one, or they start a family. it’s a topic, that unless faced with, is often put to the back of peoples minds as something that can be done later.

On the exterior, as an industry, the funeral business is as traditional as traditional gets. High street shops could easily fit in to an victorian street scene.

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Similarly, until relatively recently, mortgages have been the same. Banking, in general has a head start with products/services such as monzo.

Changes afoot

Some startups have looked at the opportunity – everyone dies, and have started making the preparation for it smarter and more user friendly.

Beyond.life helps people plan funerals and write wills.

“When there’s a will, there’s a… solicitor’s bill.” Until now

Strapline on a beyond.life advert

farewill is a similar product. it offers simple, intuitive and easy do-it-yourself will writing service.

poppysfunerals is a modern funeral director.

These services are working to transform the experience of people who may not have their where the products they offer may not be top of mind. They are making their services look and feel like the other services we’ve become accustomed to, and very different to the stuffy, victorian shop that we see on high streets which we’d rather not think about or engage with.

Perception

It’s a hard task trying to convince someone to think about something they don’t want to, or are actively avoid. Especially when the person feels that they don’t have anything of value to leave.

How do you convince someone that they need to arrange something now when they don’t need it for potentially another 50 years?